Posts tagged #RE Mayer

Design Principles: Relevance

Beach Walk Insights - Volume 2, Issue 16 - Play time 1m 49s

In the seventh and final episode of this mini-series I take a closer look at the seventh multimedia design principle, which came from the excellent research conducted by Prof. RE Mayer, J Sweller et al. 

This final principle is all about being relevant, for example by using everyday language. Resist the temptation of using big, impressive words in an attempt to 'big up' your own ego - it'll  reduce the likelihood of you being remembered.

If your audience needs a dictionary to translate your presentation, they're more likely to disengage and your message will be forgotten - and the only reason you are on the stage in the first place is to be remembered.

This principle applies to all forms of communication, whether you're writing a proposal or an email, or you are being interviewed on the radio.  Making your material relevant to your audience will make you more memorable. 

Posted on May 15, 2015 and filed under BWI, Seven Design Principles.

Design Principles: Redundancy

Beach Walk Insights - Volume 2, Issue 15 - Play time 1m 38s

In the sixth episode of this mini-series I take a closer look at the sixth multimedia design principle, which came from the excellent research conducted by Prof. RE Mayer, J Sweller et al. 

If you are explaining a particular point to your audience, then don't have the very same explanation on the screen. This forces them to make a choice between listening to you, or reading your slides. Whichever they choose, they will be distracted by the other - making it less likely your message will be remembered. 

Likewise, if you want them to read a customer testimonial, for example, then allow them to do just that. Turn towards your slide to direct your audience's attention to the slide and away from you, read the slide silently yourself, count to ten, and then face your audience and re-engage them.

The rule of thumb is: "If you show it, don't say it, and if you say it, don't show it".

Posted on May 1, 2015 and filed under BWI, Seven Design Principles.

Design Principles: Choosing The Right Mode (5/7)

Beach Walk Insights - Volume 2, Issue 14 - Play time 1m 30s

In the fifth episode of this mini-series I take a closer look at the fifth multimedia design principle, which came from the excellent research conducted by Prof. RE Mayer, J Sweller et al. 

This principle is all about choosing the best mode for communicating your message. This principle simply says people prefer to listen to a well illustrated presentation over reading a well illustrated text. 

Going back to a point that I've stressed before, presentation slides should be used as a visual aid and not as your script. If your slides are text heavy your audience is naturally going to attempt to read them - and if they're reading then they can't be listening.

Using illustrations that support your message will increase the likelihood of your audience remembering your message in their long term memory. 

Posted on April 24, 2015 and filed under BWI, Seven Design Principles.

Design Principles: Coherence (4/7)

Beach Walk Insights - Volume 2, Issue 13 - Play time 49s

In the fourth episode of this mini-series I take a closer look at the fourth multimedia design principle, which came from the excellent research conducted by Prof. RE Mayer, J Sweller et al. 

This principle is as simple as it is important - and yet it's frequently overlooked. When applied well, the 'coherence' principle ensures that there is a consistent message running through your argument/presentation - and that all your associated material is linked to supporting your case.

All too often people 'over-present' - they deliver way too much material, in the hope that if they throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stick. This is very inefficient, not to mention confusing. Audiences quite simply 'lose the thread'.

Create a more successful presentation by focusing on a key message. If your information supports this message, there's a far greater chance of your audience (a) being convinced by your point of view and (b) remembering your message.

Posted on April 17, 2015 and filed under BWI, Seven Design Principles.

Design Principles: Temporal Contiguity (3/7)

Beach Walk Insights - Volume 2, Issue 12 - Play time 1m 38s

In the third episode of this mini-series I take a closer look at the third multimedia design principle, which came from the excellent research conducted by Prof. RE Mayer, J Sweller et al. 

This principle says that the tighter the synchronicity between narration and supporting graphics, the easier it is for the audience to follow the line of argument.

All to often I see presenters display huge amounts of information on their slides, while they rabbit on explaining it all. This forces members of the audience to choose between digesting the large amount information on the slide, or listening to the presenter. This approach can overload an audience to the extent that they remember little of the presentation.

Tight synchronisation between the narration and supporting graphics maximises audience engagement and retention. 

Posted on April 10, 2015 and filed under Seven Design Principles, BWI.

Design Principles: Spacial Contiguity (2/7)

Beach Walk Insights - Volume 2, Issue 11 - Play time 1m 25s

In the second episode of this mini-series I take a closer look at the second multimedia design principle, which came from the excellent research conducted by Prof. RE Mayer, J Sweller et al. 

This principle, known as Spacial Contiguity, simply says that words and pictures relating to one another are better understood if positioned close together. Simple enough, but how often are you faced with confusing documents and presentations where this isn't the case?

For example, If you're designing a company Annual Report the notes describing balance sheet should be positioned in sight of the figures, not on the next page. As straightforward and common sense as this sounds, it's amazing how many poorly designed forms, documents and presentations once you're attuned to this simple logic. Here's another example, if you're annotating a group photograph, position names as close to the people to whom they belong - something Facebook manages do quite well.

Posted on April 2, 2015 and filed under BWI, Seven Design Principles.

Design Principles: Use Multi-Media (1/7)

Beach Walk Insights - Volume 2, Issue 10 - Play time 1m 09s

In this new mini-series I take a closer look at the seven design principles, which came from the excellent research conducted by RE Mayer, J Sweller et al. 

The first principle is quite simple - you should use multi-media. Illustrations combined with narration work far better than narration on its own.  Quite simple, but how often do people actually do this? I have witnessed countless presentations where there was inadequate use of supporting graphics. 

When creating a presentation you ought to create your slides whilst crafting your script. Your slides shouldn't make sense on their own, and they shouldn't be an after thought. By developing them at the same time as your script, it ensures they work together - increasing the chance of your audience remembering your message long after your presentation.

Posted on March 27, 2015 and filed under Seven Design Principles, BWI.